Do you use Facebook a lot? You may have to reduce Facebook use if you don’t want it to damage your health.

According to Newsweek, a recent study suggests that the more people use Facebook, the worse they will feel ill.

When people use Facebook more by liking posts, checking their friends’ profiles, the worse they will actually feel which is not good for their health.

Study: More Facebook Use Could Damage Your Health
When people use Facebook more by liking posts, checking their friends’ profiles, the worse they will actually feel which is not good for their health.

Previous studies have also revealed that spending time online and away from face-to-face social relationships can lead to internet addiction and sedentary behavior.

Moreover, an in-depth study conducted by John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health revealed that almost all forms of interaction with Facebook can lead to a decline in one’s health.

Negative self-comparisons due to Facebook activities

In the Harvard Business Review, Holly Shakya and Nicholas Christakis stated that they measured three Facebook activities: liking, posting and clicking links. It was concluded that all these 3 activities lead to negative self-comparisons and it made them feel bad about themselves.

Study: More Facebook Use Could Damage Your Health
Spending time using Facebook led to negative effects to one’s mental and physical health and their body index changed over time relative to their use of Facebook.

Shakya and Christakis emphasized that liking other people’s statuses and clicking posts on their walls were the biggest factor in decreased happiness. They also said that merely spending time using Facebook led to negative effects to one’s mental and physical health and their body index changed over time relative to their use of Facebook.

“While screen time in general can be problematic, the tricky thing about social media is that while we are using it, we get the impression that we are engaging in meaningful social interaction. Our results suggest that the nature and quality of this sort of connection is no substitute for the real world interaction we need for a healthy life.”